Author: Dr. Rodney G. Alsup

MBAs – Have You Chosen Your Google Reader Replacement?

In March of this year, Google announced that on July 1, 2013 they would retire Google Reader. Since retirement day has passed, I thought I would remind the MyeEMBA followers of two things, as well as to suggest Feedly as a replacement reader for those who have not selected one already.

My reminders:

1) After July 1, Google Reader will no longer be available for users to access updated content and saved articles.
2) You can save Google Reader content and subscriptions by selecting a replacement reader that allows for importing content and subscription information or by exporting Google Reader data into an OPML file, which allows access later on.

My solution for the Google Reader retirement was to choose Feedly, a reader that imported my Google Reader content and subscriptions. The result is uninterrupted access to my content and subscriptions and I did not need to create an OPML data file for later access.

My decision did not come easily, as I reviewed and experimented with almost a dozen readers, all identified in Hrishi Mittal’s list of 68 Google Reader alternatives. With these experiences in mind, let me share some of my observations and thoughts.

MBAs – Will the Next Year Be Your Best Year Yet?

This month, I want to introduce you to a program that I recently learned about, The Best Year Yet (BYY). The BYY program is an extremely simple model or system that helps you set personal goals, tracks your progress toward achieving those goals and helps you produce the results you want. While many goal-setting programs in the marketplace purport to do these things, for various reasons many do not. Although, I am a new adopter of the BYY program, I can already see how it can benefit MBA students and MBA alumni. Let me explain by introducing you to BYY, discussing why I think MBAs will benefit from its use and what I like about BYY. Click on the title to view the complete article.

Three Year Anniversary Report to Readers | MyeEMBA

The first MyeEMBA article appeared on May 14, 2010. The article, “Accepted Into An MBA Program – Now What?” has had 190 views in three years, while the most recent article, “MBA Students and Financial Literacy” has had 276 views in 14 days. Of particular interest is that 21.8% of the visitors are returning visitors. As the following Table indicates, visitors and page views are increasing.

MBA Students and Financial Literacy

MBA students need to develop the knowledge and skills to manage their financial resources effectively so that they will have a lifetime of financial wellbeing. Most MBA programs do not help their students develop financial literacy. Accordingly, developing the knowledge and skills to become financially literate is an individual MBA student’s responsibility.

As a newly accepted MBA student or a currently enrolled MBA student, are you prepared to address the financial wellbeing issues resulting from your participation in an MBA program?

April is financial literacy month in the United States. However, generally, financial literacy is not a discernible part of the modern-day MBA curriculum. Designers of MBA curriculum either assume: 1) that MBA students will extract the bits and pieces from the curriculum—as they progress through their program—to make them financially literate and better managers of their personal-financial resources or 2) that financial literacy development is not appropriate for an MBA program. Thus, most MBA programs focus on helping managers and leaders become more effective at managing an organization’s resources and very little, if at all, on helping them to become more effective managers of their own resources. In my opinion, the skill sets and knowledge that make up financial literacy are as critical to an MBA graduate’s career success and wellbeing as are the concepts included in the MBA curriculum.

Click on the title to view the rest of the article.

Ten MBA Student Behaviors that Can Differentiate You

Newly enrolled MBA students learn very quickly that not all of their MBA peers exhibit the same behaviors. While some differences are expected, others are surprising. It is these differences that make individuals interesting or that give a class its personality. From an individual standpoint, if properly managed, these differences can make you a standout among your classmates. More importantly, when classmates and faculty members view these behavioral differences positively, they become differentiators.

I believe the following behaviors, if properly handled, can become differentiators for most MBA students:

MBAs – Do You Know How You Are Spending Your Online Time?

Do you know how much time you spend working with your computer each day? More importantly, how much of that time is productive? Most MBA students cannot answer these two questions with any certainty. However, MBA students run the risk of productivity loss because of their dependence on technology and multitasking. As aspiring executives, MBA students need to understand where their time actually goes each waking hour.

Click on the title to learn how to find out the answers to these questions.