Category: Enrolled! Now What?

MBA Students Can Provide Quality Program Feedback If …

Feedback is the lifeblood of a quality MBA program, the source of which is most often the curriculum’s own students and alumni. As a program improves and its reputation grows, the value of the degree also grows for all degree holders, even for those who graduated years ago. Unfortunately, when MBA students and alumni provide feedback, the quality is lacking, so they do not make as valuable a contribution as they could. Sometimes, quality is lacking because of the timing of the feedback request; or because respondents take too little time to prepare their response; or because respondents fail to recall the details necessary for providing quality feedback. MBA students and alumni can do many things to improve the quality of their feedback. For example, the most important element may be finding ways to improve their recall of events and activities in sufficient detail to be useful for providing feedback.

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MBA Students – What do you do if you don’t like your MBA program?

Most MBA students do not find themselves unhappy with their MBA program. However, many do find that, during their pursuit of an MBA, they develop an attitude or feeling of disapproval of certain aspects of the program and they find little pleasure from their participation in the program. In the short term, such attitudes or feelings can adversely affect a student’s learning, while, in the long term, they can affect student and alumni advocacy for the program. What should an MBA student do when they find themselves in this situation?

10 Things MBA Students Can Do To Develop a Knowledge-Worker Mindset

The MyeEMBA article, “Do MBA Students have the Mind Set to be Knowledge Workers?” generated a sizable number of comments on LinkedIn. One comment by Augustine Mayomi (TopMBA) wanted me to suggest ways a new MBA graduate could develop a knowledge-worker mindset. This article addresses Augustine’s request by identifying 10 things MBA graduates can do on their own to develop the mindsets that is necessary for their becoming knowledge workers. I regard these 10 as a starting point and invite the MyeEMBA readers to add their own suggestions in the comments section below.

I think the key to developing a knowledge-worker mindset starts with the understanding that, as Drucker put it, “In knowledge work, the task is not given; it has to be determined.” and, perhaps more importantly, task or problem determination requires thinking. While MBA students are predisposed to action, they need to learn that thinking before doing is critical to developing a knowledge-worker mindset. Furthermore, learning to think about task clarity and determining the task is an acquired skill that requires a lot of individual time and effort to develop. From an MBA student’s or a new MBA graduate’s perspective, understanding and developing new ways of thinking is what helps develop a knowledge-worker mindset. With this thought in mind, I suggest the following:

MBA Students and Proper Online Business Etiquette

Two of my recent articles, “MBA Students Do You See Yourself as Your MBA Peers See You” and “MBA Program No Asshole Rule” addressed MBA student behavior while enrolled in an MBA program. A behavior related area that appears to be gaining interest is online business etiquette, a topic that is certainly something MBA students need to keep in mind as they use multiple forms of social media to advance their careers and interact with their MBA classmates, faculty, staff, and other professionals. One online misstep can have an adverse impact on one’s career advancement. Click on the title to read the complete article.

Can MBA Students Learn to be Creative

Can MBA students learn to be creative during their MBA program? More importantly, if they do learn to be creative during this time, will they be creative throughout their careers? On the other hand, is creativity something that MBA students can cultivate through rigorous training during their graduate programs and continue developing by deliberately practicing certain core abilities and skills over an extended period? The simple answer is yes. However, research suggests that increasing one’s creativity requires rigorous training and practice. If this is the case, then many, if not most MBA students, will find the answer is no because their MBA program’s design seldom provides the appropriate course content and practice time necessary for developing lifelong creativity.