Category: MBA

MBA Lurking

Most of us are aware of the concept of online lurking – people reading messages sent to an online forum or discussion group without contributing, but what do you know about MBA lurking?

What is MBA Lurking?

MBA lurking is what a subset of MBA students do while enrolled in an MBA program. MBA student lurkers are the nonparticipants. They rarely take part in class, team, or online discussions and they seldom provide meaningful feedback when ask to do so. They fill a seat and use program resources while contributing little, if anything, to the learning of others.

Independent Learner Skills May be Critical to an MBA’s Success

While reading Kio Stark’s book, Don’t Go Back to School: A Handbook for Learning Anything, I discovered that I am an independent learner. I also realized that for most of my early life, I was a dependent learner, as I progressed through the formal education system – K-12, BBA degree, MBA, D.B.A., and various certification programs. The transition or evolution from dependent learner to independent learner was not obvious to me, yet it happened. In retrospect, had the changeover occurred sooner, advancement along my chosen career path might have been faster. For this reason, I believe that the sooner MBAs become independent learners, the faster they will advance along their chosen career path. Moreover, I believe an MBA program is the perfect place to start developing independent learning skills.

Three Year Anniversary Report to Readers | MyeEMBA

The first MyeEMBA article appeared on May 14, 2010. The article, “Accepted Into An MBA Program – Now What?” has had 190 views in three years, while the most recent article, “MBA Students and Financial Literacy” has had 276 views in 14 days. Of particular interest is that 21.8% of the visitors are returning visitors. As the following Table indicates, visitors and page views are increasing.

MBA Students and Financial Literacy

MBA students need to develop the knowledge and skills to manage their financial resources effectively so that they will have a lifetime of financial wellbeing. Most MBA programs do not help their students develop financial literacy. Accordingly, developing the knowledge and skills to become financially literate is an individual MBA student’s responsibility.

As a newly accepted MBA student or a currently enrolled MBA student, are you prepared to address the financial wellbeing issues resulting from your participation in an MBA program?

April is financial literacy month in the United States. However, generally, financial literacy is not a discernible part of the modern-day MBA curriculum. Designers of MBA curriculum either assume: 1) that MBA students will extract the bits and pieces from the curriculum—as they progress through their program—to make them financially literate and better managers of their personal-financial resources or 2) that financial literacy development is not appropriate for an MBA program. Thus, most MBA programs focus on helping managers and leaders become more effective at managing an organization’s resources and very little, if at all, on helping them to become more effective managers of their own resources. In my opinion, the skill sets and knowledge that make up financial literacy are as critical to an MBA graduate’s career success and wellbeing as are the concepts included in the MBA curriculum.

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MBAs – Do You Know How You Are Spending Your Online Time?

Do you know how much time you spend working with your computer each day? More importantly, how much of that time is productive? Most MBA students cannot answer these two questions with any certainty. However, MBA students run the risk of productivity loss because of their dependence on technology and multitasking. As aspiring executives, MBA students need to understand where their time actually goes each waking hour.

Click on the title to learn how to find out the answers to these questions.

MBA Students Can Provide Quality Program Feedback If …

Feedback is the lifeblood of a quality MBA program, the source of which is most often the curriculum’s own students and alumni. As a program improves and its reputation grows, the value of the degree also grows for all degree holders, even for those who graduated years ago. Unfortunately, when MBA students and alumni provide feedback, the quality is lacking, so they do not make as valuable a contribution as they could. Sometimes, quality is lacking because of the timing of the feedback request; or because respondents take too little time to prepare their response; or because respondents fail to recall the details necessary for providing quality feedback. MBA students and alumni can do many things to improve the quality of their feedback. For example, the most important element may be finding ways to improve their recall of events and activities in sufficient detail to be useful for providing feedback.

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