Category: Work-Life Balance & Wellbeing for MBAs

Ten New Year’s Resolutions for MBA Students

As 2012 ends, many MBA students will take the time to reflect on the year and their many accomplishments while others will take the opportunity to look forward by establishing goals, which, at this time of year, is usually referred to as 2013’s New Year’s Resolutions. With this thought in mind, I take this opportunity to suggest a few resolutions for the current group of MBA students.

My suggested Resolutions are somewhat simple, and I believe they are easy to keep or to perform at least once. Most relate to things you can do to influence the perceptions others have of you, especially your MBA peers. While the MBA program environment is the focus of my resolutions, adopting and keeping any one of them may go beyond the MBA classroom and have a positive effect on other areas of your professional and personal life.

I recommend that you adopt one, some, or all of the following resolutions sometime during the first 90 days of 2013.

MBA Students – Is it Laziness or Exhausted Self-Control

Many MBA faculty members think that MBA students are lazy. Why do they think this? Well, perhaps it is because some MBA students come to class without completing homework assignments, without reading assigned articles and book chapters, and when in class they are not active participants in discussions. Since most of my experience is with part time MBA students and Executive MBA students, I attributed this type of behavior to work-life balance issues. Now there may be another answer, exhausted self-control.

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MBAs Enhance Your Wellbeing by Sharing Your Homework Time

Managing work-life balance, social wellbeing, and family activities while earning an MBA is challenging, especially in today’s fast-paced electronic world. For MBA students finding time to do that which is important is difficult. One option MBA students may want to consider is sharing homework time.

Click on the heading to read more about sharing homework time.

MBA Students Need to Evaluate Their Current Financial Situation

Previously, I outlined four action steps to help MBA students manage the financial impact of starting and paying for an MBA program. I followed up with a discussion of the first step, assessing your financial wellbeing. The second step, evaluating your current financial situation, is the subject of this post.

Why Evaluate Your Current Financial Situation?

Since MBA programs typically want you to pay your MBA program’s tuition and fees in advance it is a good idea to identify as soon as possible the source of the funds you will use to make these payments. Waiting until the last minute or focusing on only one source can result in a negative long-term impact on your financial wellbeing. Evaluating your current financial situation, however simple or complex it may be, helps you minimize the negative impact.

MBA Twofers – What Are They and How Do You Get Them

‘Twofer’ is a slang term that describes an item that is selling two for the price of one. So what is an MBA twofer you ask? An MBA twofer is a phrase that I use to describe a concept whereby an MBA student takes advantage of the opportunity to gain at least one additional benefit from an assignment they must complete for one of their MBA classes. Many MBA class assignments have MBA twofer potential, however exploiting that potential is at the discretion of the individual student. Therefore, exploitation may well be a function of student insight, vision, and motivation. Let me explain.

Read the rest of the post to learn more about MBA Twofers.

Assessing Financial Wellbeing While Earning My MBA

You are starting your MBA program, so why should you assess or measure your financial wellbeing? Furthermore, why should you monitor your financial wellbeing during your MBA program?

I am sure there are many reasons why you should assess your financial wellbeing prior to starting your MBA program. However, I think the most important reason is so you can identify what impact the financial implications of starting an MBA program will have on your life and the lives of others. In addition, measuring and monitoring the impact allows you to manage proactively and mitigate the impact as well as demonstrate the effectiveness of your actions. Finally, I think it is a good habit to establish.

Read more to learn: how to assess financial wellbeing; who should assess their financial wellbeing; how to use assessment results; how often to assess and more.