MBA Students and Financial Literacy

MBA students need to develop the knowledge and skills to manage their financial resources effectively so that they will have a lifetime of financial wellbeing. Most MBA programs do not help their students develop financial literacy. Accordingly, developing the knowledge and skills to become financially literate is an individual MBA student’s responsibility.

As a newly accepted MBA student or a currently enrolled MBA student, are you prepared to address the financial wellbeing issues resulting from your participation in an MBA program?

April is financial literacy month in the United States. However, generally, financial literacy is not a discernible part of the modern-day MBA curriculum. Designers of MBA curriculum either assume: 1) that MBA students will extract the bits and pieces from the curriculum—as they progress through their program—to make them financially literate and better managers of their personal-financial resources or 2) that financial literacy development is not appropriate for an MBA program. Thus, most MBA programs focus on helping managers and leaders become more effective at managing an organization’s resources and very little, if at all, on helping them to become more effective managers of their own resources. In my opinion, the skill sets and knowledge that make up financial literacy are as critical to an MBA graduate’s career success and wellbeing as are the concepts included in the MBA curriculum.

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Ten MBA Student Behaviors that Can Differentiate You

Newly enrolled MBA students learn very quickly that not all of their MBA peers exhibit the same behaviors. While some differences are expected, others are surprising. It is these differences that make individuals interesting or that give a class its personality. From an individual standpoint, if properly managed, these differences can make you a standout among your classmates. More importantly, when classmates and faculty members view these behavioral differences positively, they become differentiators.

I believe the following behaviors, if properly handled, can become differentiators for most MBA students:

MBAs – Do You Know How You Are Spending Your Online Time?

Do you know how much time you spend working with your computer each day? More importantly, how much of that time is productive? Most MBA students cannot answer these two questions with any certainty. However, MBA students run the risk of productivity loss because of their dependence on technology and multitasking. As aspiring executives, MBA students need to understand where their time actually goes each waking hour.

Click on the title to learn how to find out the answers to these questions.

MBA Students Can Provide Quality Program Feedback If …

Feedback is the lifeblood of a quality MBA program, the source of which is most often the curriculum’s own students and alumni. As a program improves and its reputation grows, the value of the degree also grows for all degree holders, even for those who graduated years ago. Unfortunately, when MBA students and alumni provide feedback, the quality is lacking, so they do not make as valuable a contribution as they could. Sometimes, quality is lacking because of the timing of the feedback request; or because respondents take too little time to prepare their response; or because respondents fail to recall the details necessary for providing quality feedback. MBA students and alumni can do many things to improve the quality of their feedback. For example, the most important element may be finding ways to improve their recall of events and activities in sufficient detail to be useful for providing feedback.

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Ten New Year’s Resolutions for MBA Students

As 2012 ends, many MBA students will take the time to reflect on the year and their many accomplishments while others will take the opportunity to look forward by establishing goals, which, at this time of year, is usually referred to as 2013’s New Year’s Resolutions. With this thought in mind, I take this opportunity to suggest a few resolutions for the current group of MBA students.

My suggested Resolutions are somewhat simple, and I believe they are easy to keep or to perform at least once. Most relate to things you can do to influence the perceptions others have of you, especially your MBA peers. While the MBA program environment is the focus of my resolutions, adopting and keeping any one of them may go beyond the MBA classroom and have a positive effect on other areas of your professional and personal life.

I recommend that you adopt one, some, or all of the following resolutions sometime during the first 90 days of 2013.

Can MBA Students Benefit From A Non-Attribution Policy?

When talking with others, we sometimes say, “Now don’t tell anyone I said ….” Such statements are a request for non-attribution. The request is just for the case at hand and incorporated easily into the conversation. On the other hand, group settings, such as MBA classrooms, pose a different problem. Can you imagine an MBA classmate during a class discussion prefacing a comment with, “Now, don’t say I said this but my company …?” That situation is unlikely because when a student with valuable real world experiences to share is concerned about attribution, he or she is usually unwilling to participate in an open discussion. Unfortunately, the result is a missed learning opportunity for the class. One way of addressing the concerns of students regarding attribution is for the MBA class or the MBA program to adopt a non-attribution policy.

MBA Students: Bookmark, Share, and Annotate Web Pages with Diigo

Bookmarking, sharing, and annotating web pages found during a productive web search is particularly troublesome for me, and I am sure this is true for many others, especially MBA students. Why? Because search technologies make it so easy to find large quantities of material that may prove useful to a project or search objective. In collaborative work environments, such as MBA programs, search is only one part of the workflow. Making notes and sharing findings is another critical aspect. With this need in mind, I am always looking for tools and techniques to help me manage what I find. One of the tools I discovered and frequently use is Diigo, a browser add-on tool and cloud-based information management service. Having used Diigo for more than two years, I can recommend this tool to MBA students and MBA faculty members. Click on the title to learn more about how Diigo can help MBA student live and work smarter.