MBA Students and Survey Tools

Sometime during their MBA program, MBA students learn the importance of data collection and the role data plays in decision-making. However, they are unlikely to learn much about the logistics of data collection, such as questionnaire design and the use of web-based survey tools. While learning the logistics of data collection may not be part of the curriculum of most MBA programs, it is important because logistical issues can make a significant difference to decision makers and the quality of the decisions they make. One way of learning some of the basics is for MBA students to begin using several of the available tools while they are earning their MBA degree.

Two tools with which I am familiar and use on a regular basis are SurveyMonkey and Google Forms. I use each for survey data collection and for standardizing data collection when manually collecting data from multiple sources, such as websites. Google Forms is free and SurveyMonkey has a reduced-capabilities version that is also free. Even though their names imply otherwise, both tools are useful for data collection when using either a questionnaire or a form.

MBA Student File-Sharing Tools Revisited

MBA students working together with one or more classmates in order to complete an assignment is a norm in most MBA programs. Working together successfully often depends on how well the group shares information. This usually means sharing a document or file of some kind, such as an MS Word document, PowerPoint presentation, PDF file, picture, graphic, or a spreadsheet. While MBA students working together may be the norm for most MBA programs, providing students effective and efficient ways of sharing documents is not. The answer for most MBA programs is to let students find their own solution, which usually means using email and file attachments. Much better solutions are available, many of which are consumer-focused, user friendly, and free.

Case Studies Can Help MBA Students Prepare for Job Interviews

MBA faculty members routinely assign cases as a way to help MBA students develop problem-solving and analytic skills. Therefore, most MBA students are very familiar with the case study as a tool for learning. Unfortunately, many of these same MBA students fail to see how case studies can benefit them beyond the classroom. While it may not be obvious, I believe MBA students can use case studies for career development and professional advancement—for example, in preparing for a job interview.

MBA Students – What do you do if you don’t like your MBA program?

Most MBA students do not find themselves unhappy with their MBA program. However, many do find that, during their pursuit of an MBA, they develop an attitude or feeling of disapproval of certain aspects of the program and they find little pleasure from their participation in the program. In the short term, such attitudes or feelings can adversely affect a student’s learning, while, in the long term, they can affect student and alumni advocacy for the program. What should an MBA student do when they find themselves in this situation?

Should MBA Students Develop a Healthy Distrust of Wikipedia?

A recent MyeEMBA article addressed the issue of Wikipedia being an appropriate resource for MBA students. The article generated a lot of discussion. The consensus appears to be that MBA students can use Wikipedia as a starting point; however, MBA students should not use Wikipedia as the authoritative source. Two recent online articles provide new information regarding Wikipedia practices, which reinforces the conclusion that MBA students should not use Wikipedia as an authoritative source. The articles call into question the quality and objectivity of Wikipedia’s content and provide insight into Wikipedia’s editorial process and the way in which Wikipedia editors manage content changes.

10 Things MBA Students Can Do To Develop a Knowledge-Worker Mindset

The MyeEMBA article, “Do MBA Students have the Mind Set to be Knowledge Workers?” generated a sizable number of comments on LinkedIn. One comment by Augustine Mayomi (TopMBA) wanted me to suggest ways a new MBA graduate could develop a knowledge-worker mindset. This article addresses Augustine’s request by identifying 10 things MBA graduates can do on their own to develop the mindsets that is necessary for their becoming knowledge workers. I regard these 10 as a starting point and invite the MyeEMBA readers to add their own suggestions in the comments section below.

I think the key to developing a knowledge-worker mindset starts with the understanding that, as Drucker put it, “In knowledge work, the task is not given; it has to be determined.” and, perhaps more importantly, task or problem determination requires thinking. While MBA students are predisposed to action, they need to learn that thinking before doing is critical to developing a knowledge-worker mindset. Furthermore, learning to think about task clarity and determining the task is an acquired skill that requires a lot of individual time and effort to develop. From an MBA student’s or a new MBA graduate’s perspective, understanding and developing new ways of thinking is what helps develop a knowledge-worker mindset. With this thought in mind, I suggest the following:

8 Qualities of Remarkable MBA Students – A Peer Perspective

While reading a recent article by Jeff Haden, “8 Qualities of Remarkable Employees” my thoughts turned to the qualities of remarkable MBA students. I took the liberty of reworking Jeff’s eight qualities, modifying his wording so it applied to MBA students and created new qualities and descriptions when his wording would not work. Furthermore, I realized while writing that an MBA faculty member’s list of qualities will likely differ from those found on an MBA student’s list. With this in mind, the following qualities are those that I think make an MBA student remarkable in the eyes of an MBA classmate, MBA peer, or MBA team member. Moreover, I see these eight qualities as a starting point. I invite the MyeEMBA readers to add to the list.

Great MBA peers are “reliable, dependable, proactive, diligent, respectful, willing to share… they possess a wide range of easily-defined—but hard to find—qualities.” However, some are remarkable, possessing qualities that may not appear on admission criteria but nonetheless make a major impact on the experiences of other MBA students.